THE LIFE STYLE OF A TRAVELING DANCE INSTRUCTOR

Adapted from the text of Jason Haynes – Source: http://latindancecommunity.com/lifestyle-of-a-traveling-dance-instructor/

WANTED

Individual to use their talents to serve and instruct the community at weekend dance events, and potentially improve the lives of those you encounter. Must be willing to travel to the four corners of the globe, meet lots of interesting people, and see incredible sights. Must not like routine and working in an office setting.

Oh…and you get paid to dance Brazilian Zouk, Salsa, Bachata, and/or Kizomba!

Sound good? Do you accept the position?

Well if you do then you’ve just signed up to be…(bongo beat)…a traveling latin dance instructor!

Aside from the incredibly exciting job description…what exactly does that entail?

Over the past few years I’ve spoken with and interviewed several instructors who literally spend every weekend on the road teaching dance in a location other than their home locale. Popular dancers with extensive travel schedules, among many others. As I became more involved in the “latin dance media” (so to speak), I began to wonder what their lives were really like. I discovered that although all instructors have different and unique experiences there do seem to be common lifestyle threads that create the pros and cons of…“The Lifestyle of A Traveling Dance Instructor”.

The Challenges:

long-distance-relationshipHard to maintain a relationship:  I’ve heard it numerous times, so I will start with the relationship aspect.  Being in a committed relationship or even starting one is hard for many traveling professionals, but particularly for dance instructors. First, your source of income is often dependent upon traveling to different events and usually in a different location every weekend.  Most (if not all) relationships need time to cultivate and develop a connection, and weekends for many couples are an opportunity to catch up on quality time.  Not for traveling dance instructors…that’s when it’s time to work. Weekend nights for them are spent at socials dancing, not going to movies or hanging out at home eating pizza and chillin’.  Promoters and organizers aren’t going to pay for significant others to travel (unless they’re the primary dance partner), so most weekends are spent away from their partners.

This leads to the second component…Temptation.

Let’s be honest. Our dance community is filled with lots of attractive and sexy

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POSTURE – Tips For Social Dance

Posture is very important.

Working on your posture will enhance your whole experience of the dance. In order to connect well in an embrace so that your partner feels comfortable, to execute variety of sequences with ease, or to own the integrity of the dance, a better posture is key. Straight spine, head level, chest lifted, core strong, relaxed, and confident. Not only does it please the eye, you won’t end up kicking your partner in the shins, stepping on their toes, or breaking their back. This will likely decrease the chances of people running away to avoid dancing with you.